Parents and professionals connecting to facilitate care and enhance educational support.

Articulation


One of the first questions parents of young children who stutter often ask me is, “Should we talk at home about stuttering?” Parents may say, “We weren’t sure how to start the discussion”, or “we don’t want him to become self-conscious so we haven’t pointed it out”. And most of the time when I ask the follow-up question, “Do you think he’s aware of his stutter?”, I get a cautious affirmative. “Yeah, I think so”.



Early signs of speech, language, auditory processing difficulties can lead to reading and writing problems once kids enter school. Parents whose children are already in school and struggling with reading can also look back to see if early signs were present. An educational therapist or licensed speech/language pathologist can help parents identify and address these problems.



Even without obstructive sleep apnea, some children struggle to obtain a good night’s sleep. Causes can range from a deficit in melatonin, childhood depression or anxiety, or something as simple as the temperature in the room. No matter the cause, any lack of sleep can result in attention, learning, or language problems.



As a child’s vocabulary grows, they begin stringing words into more complex phrases and sentences. Children usually begin combining words into short phrases around 24 months of age or after they have a vocabulary of at least 35 to 50 words. Sometimes children are able to put sentences together, but they are not using appropriate grammatical endings or are confusing certain verb tenses. Difficulty formulating complex sentences may be an indication that a child needs a speech and language assessme



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Articulation Fluency Disorder/Stuttering Language Disorder

How to Talk Openly with Your Child about Stuttering

ChildNEXUS

May 26, 2021